Let me clarify — wrong for YOUR business.

Your strategy should be as unique as you are.  If you can delete just a few key words and your plan is unidentifiable as yours, it may not be the strategy you need.

Strategy doesn’t begin with deciding what steps you will take to meet your goals.  It starts well before that.  It begins with your company DNA and an understanding of why your customers do business with you.  Without those foundational elements, your strategy misses the mark.

Company DNA

The company DNA is the combination of the core purpose or passion – the reason your business exists – and the values inherent in the organization. DNA drive everything in your company and it sets you apart from your competition.

Your position in the marketplace

Your customers choose to do business with you.  What is it that compels them to select you over others in a crowded market?  If you don’t know, there is one sure way to find out – ask them!

Understanding your strengths and weaknesses as well as the opportunities and threats you face help round out your market niche and how you can leverage your unique position.

Armed with the info above, you can better define the products and services you provide with clarity which allows you to sharpen your brand and target your audience.

Now plan your strategy

Your strategy will set the goals you are trying to attain along with the steps you will take to achieve them.  They should leverage your unique purpose, values, and niche.  Every goal and action must be specific nad have owners responsible for driving them.

If your strategy isn’t more than a list of goals, doesn’t capitalize on the elements that make you unique, and and doesn’t leverage your strengths, it isn’t the right strategy for you.


Employees long to be part of a healthy organization.  Business owners and executives reduce wasted effort and lost time by creating environments where their employees can perform their best. 

There are two aspects to a healthy business:  organizational health and operational health.

Organizational health deals with the environment of the company.  Hallmarks of an organizationally healthy organization include:

  • The company values are known and exhibited by employees at all levels of the organization.
  • People are hired, fired, and rewarded based on the company values.
  • There is open communication in the business – between different departments, teams, and levels.
  • Challenges are discussed with transparency and are solved, not allowing them to fester and get worse.
  • Employees believe in the company and its mission and values to such an extent that they hold themselves and others accountable.

Operational health focuses on how the company performs the tasks to deliver its products and services.  An operationally healthy organization can make statements like:

  • Our processes are documented and understood by everyone.
  • All team members know how their roles and the roles of others fit into the big picture.
  • Company and departmental goals are published, and everyone knows if they are being met.
  • Tasks – and even products and services – that don’t add value to the organization are eliminated.
  • The company’s structure supports timely, consistent, and informed decision making.
  • Waste and inefficiency is eliminated whenever possible.

For your business to thrive, it must be both organizationally and operationally healthy.  Only then can it effectively execute its strategy.